The Last Jedi: Getting Through the Gripes (via YouTube & Twitter)

Around the Galaxy: Star Wars News & Notes - January 31, 2018

Spoilers for The Last Jedi ahead…

YouTubers, Tweeps Break Down Episode VIII

Force Priestesses

So, I watch a lot of YouTube and read a lot of tweets. And some of what I find regarding Star Wars is decidedly off the beaten path; some is more mainstream. However, I’ve gravitated toward several channels or feeds.

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You see, I have seen Star Wars: The Last Jedi ten times, and although I have come to love and enjoy the movie (and gave it 4.5/5 stars), after the first viewing, I was not sure what exactly I watched.

Since then, and as my admiration for Rian Johnson’s epic increased via successive viewings, I found some touchstones; YouTube videos and tweets that acted as way-markers along my journey up the Jedi steps of Ahch-to.

Spiritual guides

Of course, this is NOT a comprehensive list of folks who have helped me along the way. The MSW crew, Star Wars Explained, Stephen Stanton, the ForceCenter crew, Mike Celestino, Germain Lussier, and many of you have all lent expertise — via tweet, video, or text — to my exploration of TLJ and Star Wars as a whole.

“Thank you!” to everyone listed, and everyone whom I’ve inadvertently left out. You know who you are…

What follows, is the chorus of my headcanon; my Force “priests and priestesses,” allowing me to make sense of the Saga, and its latest segment.

First up, Erik Voss and his “Star Wars LAST JEDI Review – Why Are Fans Split? (Finn Subplot Explained!)“:

This above just helped smooth out some plot points and give me common ground for my gripes.

Next is Perri Nemiroff, who on several videos has expressed exactly what she posted in her first tweet post-screening:

Then there’s Justin Scarred (of Randomland fame), and the vid, “About THE LAST JEDI and I (Spoilers)“:

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I’m a huge fan of Justin and his entourage – they are just entertaining. And I am a big fan of this very, very honest video (as well as Justin’s other Star Wars stuff). Like the other folks in this post, Scarred and I have common connections to the Original Trilogy. And, although it takes Justin a while to come around to his last solution, it’s worth the watch – if only to see him compare the old school Luke figure and a current model.

Maude Garrett’s many tweets on the subject also kept me grounded regarding expectations (and joy):

Then, watch Hello Greedo and, “Star Wars: The Last Jedi – ONE MONTH LATER – Thoughts“:

Even-handed, even-keeled. Criticism without hate. How novel?! The calm voice of the be-helmed host just brings peace to the viewer.

Similarly, Ash Crossan kept things real in her review:

“Let people enjoy what they enjoy…” said Crossan. We agree.

Finally, there’s MatPat from The Film Theorists, “How Star Wars Theories KILLED Star Wars: The Last Jedi!“:

Now, I am not in total agreement with this YouTuber’s thoughts, but I like his breakdown of how theory — and familiarity with speculation — can change how folks perceive a film. It gets pretty thick, but I enjoy the tongue in cheek mea culpa.

Moving on…

And with all of that listed, I am done with The Last Jedi breakdowns (at least until the novel and Blu-ray hit shelves).

All we need now is the Solo: A Star Wars Story trailer to arrive… JB

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John Bishop

A graduate of Boston and Northeastern universities, John Bishop became the beat reporter for BostonBruins.com prior to the B’s 2006-07 hockey season. While with the Bruins, “Bish” traveled North America and Europe to cover the Black & Gold’s every move via laptop, blog, and smart phone. The co-author of two books, Bygone Boston and Full 60 to History: The Inside Story of the 2011 Stanley Cup Champion Boston Bruins, John covered the XXI Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver in 2010 and the B’s 2011 championship run and banner raising before taking a faculty/communications position at a prep school outside Boston in 2013. He lives with his wife Andrea and sons Jack, Scott, and Luke in central Massachusetts.

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